Malteset videos

At The Science Lab

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: Students at this school take part in various extra-curricular activities such as sports, Drama, choir, school band, gymnasium, every year over 150 students participate in such activities as the Christmas Convert, The Talent Show, Prize Day Activity, Crib competition and they also have their own School Council. Life at St. Thomas More Boys Junior Lyceum is very varied and exciting. They also help students make use of their available resources and to use them in planning their activities and everyday lives. By means of these classes, students also become more in contact with their national heritage and later become more tolerant to different cultures. Overall, students are given the opportunity to be more creative, original, and efficient and intellectual, and to improve their decision-making skills and problem solving abilities. The library is like the artist’s palette. It offers the students an opportunity to broaden their vocabulary and culture. At the library, students can find all kinds of books in both Maltese and English languages. There are fiction, biography, computer, heritage, and geography amongst many others.

The current building of the school is temporary and soon it is expected to change location. Special thanks to Ms Josette Ciappara, for assisting us in the filming of these videos at the school.

EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK OF LANGUAGE: C1 Effective User

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Watching the Boat Race - Regatta

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: Every nation has its hour of glory in battle. The Regatta held on September 8th at the Grand Harbour, commemorates Malta’s victories during the Great Siege of 1565 and the Second World War. The magnificent Fort St Angelo provides an imposing backdrop to the sleek and colourful Maltese boats. Rowing teams from the cities bordering Grand Harbour, Valletta, Vittoriosa, Senglea, Kalkara, Cospicua, Bormla and Marsa, participate in a number of very exciting races, marked by extreme rivalry between participating teams and their respective supporters. For weeks on end, athletes prepare for the races with fanatic zeal and rivalry. In the afternoon of Regatta day, thousands of people crowd the waterfront and the surrounding bastions to watch the races.

LANGUAGE NOTES: C1 Effective User: At the start of this clip we listen to an informative dialogue between Cesare and the Race Arbiter, and the National Boat Race General Secretary. Later on, as the race progresses, we can follow very closely an informal dialogue between two of the race fans. We observe the extreme rivalry between quite fanatic team supporters! In fact there was some swearing in Maltese from the losing fan, which I’ve cut!

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The Church of Our Lady of Victory

 

SUMMARY + CULTURAL NOTES: This small church marks the site where Grandmaster La Valette laid down the first stone of the Capital City. The Church has a very imposing and elaborate facade of Roman Baroque sculpture. It is dedicated to the Birth of the Blessed Virgin, but is commonly known as the church of Our Lady of Victory. The church is well renowned because present is the heart of the Venetian admiral Angelo Emo, who died in Malta in 1792 and whose other mortal remains were conveyed to Venice. The Knights of St John used to pray in this Church very often, who also used it as a convent in the 16th Century. Restoration works on the ceiling are being carried out presently by the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London. The ceiling is barrel-vaulted and St. John’s church was modelled in the same way. Both churches were built by the famous Maltese engineer, Gerolamo Cassar.

EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK OF LANGUAGE: C1 Effective User

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Maltese Fireworks

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: Village feasts in Malta are not just an attraction for the public eye, but also a great deal of effort and finances are put into their making. Fireworks are not only very expensive, but we have had quite a few tragedies taking place within Fireworks Factories on the Maltese Islands. The last blast took place at the Gharb Factory, in Gozo, which claimed five lives.

LANGUAGE NOTES: C1 Effective User – Here we have an informative dialogue between the person responsible for putting up fireworks at village feasts and the cameraman.

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Interview with the Traditional Boat Race Organiser

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: Freedom Day is a public holiday in Malta and commemorates the withdrawal of British troops from the island on the 8th of September, 1979. The day is celebrated with a ceremony at the War memorial in Floriana. In the afternoon there is the traditional Boat Race, or as commonly known by the locals, the Regatta. It is held in the waters of the Grand Harbour. Food and drink stalls, flags, banners and even a big screen, line the harbour, adding to the celebratory feel. The Malta Council for Sports and the Malta Tourism Authority contribute a lot to the launching of such a big event.

LANGUAGE NOTES: C1 Effective User. Here we have an informative dialogue going on between the Traditional Boat Race Organiser and Cesare. Mainly explaining the rules of the race, all the preparation, history and culture connected to the Event.

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St Thomas More Boys Junior Lyceum in Ħamrun

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: This is St Thomas More Boys Junior Lyceum in Ħamrun. The school was inaugurated on the 12th of May 1956. It started off as a Technical School and today it is a Junior Lyceum making part of St.Thomas More College. The previous head was Ms. Josephine Mifsud whilst the present head is Mr. Michael Baldacchino. The school houses around 500 students and over 60 members of staff. The students have various subjects varying from home economics to design and technology. All class rooms are fully equipped to cater for the students' needs as can be seen in the Home Economics Rooms, computer labs, science labs and Design and Technology labs. Students can choose any science subject; IT, Technical Design, Physical Education and most students learn 3 languages or more according to their options. The students spend 5 years at this school.

EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK OF LANGUAGE: C1 Effective User

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Auberge d’Italie

 

SUMMARY + CULTURAL NOTES

The Malta Tourism Authority moved to the Auberge d'Italie on the 1st of March 2002. There is a Tourist Information Centre, where tourists can get all the information they require. Moreover, as we have seen in the video, many exhibitions of artistic and cultural value are hosted here.

The Auberge is rectangular in plan, surrounded on three sides ( Zackary, Melita and Merchants Streets ) and an openpiazza ( now occupied by the by the Bank of Valletta International and the Valletta Police Station) and the Church of Santa Caterina on the South Street side. It is laid out with rooms on all four sides, built around a large courtryard, which is almost square (51’ x 54’) and this agrees with the usual Italian practice. There is a covered way along the perimeter of this courtyard formed by an arched roofing this corridor on one side only, the Merchants Street side. In the centre of the Auberge’s courtyard is a triumphal arch erected above a well, having a large, pot-shaped well-head at the centre. The whole of the building is very fine, owing to its historical and cultural heritage.

EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK OF LANGUAGE: C1 Effective User

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The Tailor

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: A tailor is a person who makes, repairs, or alters clothing professionally, especially suits and men's clothing. Maltese costumes are incredibly unique, reflecting the island nationÕs distinct history as an independent people. We are largely believed to be related to the Italians and all Mediterranean people who in fact have similar cultures of tailoring. This is still so despite the fact that we inherited our language from the Ancient Phoenicians and from the Conquering Muslim Arabs. We see some Turkish, Greek and Italian influence in the tailorsÕ styles here in Malta. However, as the tailor himself pointed out, tailoring was much more of predominant in the past (up to the 1900s).

LANGUAGE NOTES: C1 Effective User Ð Here we have an informative, very interesting dialogue between Cesare and a local tailor about what goes on in the Tailoring business in Malta and how tailoring works.

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The Bookshop

 

Content / topic:

Duration: 2:22
Level (listening level required): A1-A2
 

Summary: Pending

Cultural notes:  Pending

Language notes
: Pending

Copyright
: CopyLeft

Transcription of video:

In Maltese: Pending

In English: Pending

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The Bookshop 2

 

Content / topic:

Duration: 2:22
Level (listening level required): A1-A2
 

Summary: Pending

Cultural notes:  Pending

Language notes
: Pending

Copyright
: CopyLeft

Transcription of video:

In Maltese: Pending

In English: Pending

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The Village Feast

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: This Basilica is dedicated to Our Lady of Victory. It bears a lot of historical connotation during the time of the war. It passed through many attacks, by the French, then the Muslim Arabs, and then Malta was under British Rule. Malta is a very religious nation, and the majority of the population is Catholic. Village feasts in Malta are a big cultural event, and many people celebrate their village Patron Saint.
 

LANGUAGE NOTES: C1 Effective User. This is a sort of documentary shot live with the main Isla Feast Organizer.

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At the Village Feast 2

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: The history of the Great Siege and how much the Sengleans have it at heart. The whole village commemorates this day with this feast and the titular statue of Malta, the Virgin Mary. Even the pillar on which it is raised has deep significance with the Great Siege Victory of 1565.

LANGUAGE NOTES: C1 Effective User. This is historical, cultural, informative dialogue. During the band, the narrator explains some of the musical instrument names in Maltese so that the learner can visualize.
 

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The Fish Hawker

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: The Maltese Open Market is set up very often, in many towns and cities, and on a regular basis. The one in Isla is set up every Monday. Many hawkers set up their own stall and they must have a permit to do so. The fish hawker sells all local fish like Lampuka (Mahi Mahi or dolphin fish) as well as some imported fish like salmon. Malta, being an island, offers some of the best dining experiences in fresh fish.

LANGUAGE NOTES: B1 Threshold Ð This is everyday shopping dialogue used when people go to buy fish. The fish hawker explains that he has lived at the fishing village of Marsaxlokk all his life, and he also goes out fishing. The seller gives a basic overview of the different types of fish to the customer and their costs according to weight. The customer is interested in the fishesÕ migratory patterns and how they fish for it. The customer then asks the fish seller how to cook the fish.

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Senglea Harbour

 

Content / topic:

Duration: 2:22
Level (listening level required): A1-A2
 

Summary: Pending

Cultural notes:  Pending

Language notes
: Pending

Copyright
: CopyLeft

Transcription of video:

In Maltese: Pending

In English: Pending

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Senglea 1

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES
The Maritime Museum is housed in the former British Naval Bakery at Vittoriosa, one of the Three Cities overlooking the Grand Harbour. The building, designed by British architect William Scamp, was erected between 1842 and 1845 on the site of the old covered slipway of the Knights of St John.
The bakery was the hub of the Yard and supplied the Royal Navy with its daily requirements of bread and biscuits. After World War II it was converted into offices and stores and as the headquarters of the Admiralty Constabulary. The building remained part of the naval establishment up to the closure of the British base in 1979. For almost two hundred years, Malta was the home of the British Mediterranean fleet. The Royal Navy kept a vast establishment on the Islands

LANGUAGE NOTES: C1 Effective User – this is a historical, cultural dialogue between the Senglea Mayor and Cesare.

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Senglea 2

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES
Grand Master L'Isle Adam and his knights sailed into the Grand Harbour at Malta in the morning of the 26 October 1530 on the carrack St. Anne, to take possession of their new home. On the 13 November he renewed the oath "to observe the privileges and usages" granted by the King of Aragon and Sicily and took formal possession of Malta in Mdina, a medieval town which was the capital city, at a pompous ceremony where the Silver key to the city was surrendered to him by the Captain of the Rod. Instead of making Mdina their headquarters, they preferred to establish themselves in Birgu, a small village in the entrance of the harbour, where they had their galleys at hand, in the shadow of Fort St. Angelo. As Birgu lacked the facilities required, they constructed bastions to fortify it against any assault and in the narrow streets they began to build their Auberges, one for each Langue - the construction work creating opportunities for the Maltese people. Where more convenient, they leased premises for this purpose. Each Langue began to bring in its men-at-arms, serving brothers, clerics, artificers, sea-captains, seamen and military engineers. A palace was also constructed which served the knights until the time of La Valette. They set up their infirmary in a private house until 1533, when they built an ad hoc hospital. Today this building houses cloister nuns.


LANGUAGE NOTES: C2 Proficient User. This is quite advanced dialogue; it is informative, documentary-style.

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Take Away

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: Almost every village in Malta and Gozo has its own Take-Away shop. Most of these are fast-food restaurants; some offer seating space while others do not. These fast food restaurants usually have a selection of fried food and also, more commonly, Pizza. Fried food consists of chicken, fish and hamburgers and is usually served with chips. Pizza is made with a wide variety of ingredients, and the most popular is the Capricciosa.

LANGUAGE NOTES: B2 Vantage Ð This is an informative dialogue between the customer and the owner at a Take-Away Restaurant. The customer is interested to know about the backside workings of this shop: the kitchen. He is hungry and wants to know about all the different types of Pizza and other fast food

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The Greengrocer

 

SUMMARY: Most towns and villages in Malta have their local greengrocer. At the greengrocerÕs, they sell a variety of every day products. One can find all kinds of fruits and vegetables, tinned products and cheeses. Almost all fruits and vegetables are grown locally. Maltese soil is very fertile to grow pumpkins, melons, carrots and potatoes. In fact, most foreign countries import the Maltese potato. There are also local vineyards in Malta, where grapes are grown and provided to local greengrocers. Pet food is also found in most greengrocers, as we have seen in this video, many Maltese people keep birds as a hobby.

EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK OF LANGUAGE: B2 Vantage Ð Normal everyday dialogue that goes on in supermarkets Ð showing around of the products and then asking for the bill.

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Mini-Market

 

SUMMARY AND CULTURAL NOTES: Most local minimarkets offer a wide basic selection of almost everything; all food stuffs and beverages that are needed on a daily basis; basic ingredients for the housewife as well as quick readymade sauces or pasta for the busy people. Almost every town or village in Malta and Gozo has its own minimarket. Minimarkets stock up their shelves with pasta, babies milk, rice, fruit and vegetables, sauces, spices and sweets. Even diabetics can have their own specialized food, such as brown bread and pasta.

LANGUAGE NOTES: B1 Threshold: This is a conversation between the shopper and the mini-market owner. The shopper wants to know what is available to him, with special interest because he is diabetic, and to be able to stock up his fridge and cupboards for rainy days.

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In The Kitchen 2

 

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Last edit: 10-06-2011

 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.


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